Peggy Nopoulos, M.D.,
SAB Co-Chair,
University of Iowa Carver
College of Medicine

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Peg Nopoulos. M.D. is the Kate Daum Research Professor of Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Neurology at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, Iowa. Her research is focused on brain and behavior and utilizes neuroimaging as its major tool for these studies. Topics of interest include brain development, sex differences, brain structure and function in children with specific conditions: those born with oral clefts, children born prematurely, and children who carry the expansion of the Huntington gene.

Carol A. Mathews, M.D.,
SAB Co-Chair,
University of California,
San Francisco

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Dr. Mathews is a board-certified psychiatrist with clinical and research expertise in Tourette Syndrome (TS), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and related neurodevelopmental disorders. Her research focuses on how genes, environment, and culture interact to cause/influence the expression of neuropsychiatric disorders, including TS. Dr. Mathews is the co-chair of the Steering Committee for the Tourette Syndrome Association International Consortium for Genetics (Tourette AssociationICG). Clinically, she directs the Obsessive Compulsive Disorders Clinic at UCSF and co-directs the Anxiety Disorders Clinic at UCSF.

Erika F. Augustine, M.D.,
University of Rochester Medical Center
School of Medicine & Dentistry

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Dr. Erika F. Augustine is a Pediatric Neurologist and Senior Instructor of Neurology and Pediatrics at the University of Rochester Medical Center. She completed undergraduate studies at Harvard College and received her M.D. degree from the University of Rochester. Dr. Augustine completed Pediatrics and Child Neurology residency training at Children’s Hospital Boston in 2008, followed by fellowship training in Pediatric Movement Disorders and Experimental Therapeutics in 2010 at the University of Rochester. Dr. Augustine’s research interests include methodology of clinical research and experimental therapeutics in rare pediatric neurological disorders. Current work focuses on therapeutics in Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis and on the epidemiology of Tourette Syndrome in minorities. She currently serves as Assistant Program Director for the NINDS-funded Experimental Therapeutics training program at the University of Rochester. She is also a member of the NIH Taskforce on Childhood Motor Disorders and is a consultant to the FDA Neurological Devices Panel.

Nicole Calakos, M.D., Ph.D.,
Duke University Medical Center

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Nicole Calakos, M.D., Ph.D. is Assistant Professor at the Center for Translational Neuroscience, Departments of Neurology and Neurobiology at Duke University. In this capacity, she combines clinical care of Movement Disorder patients with laboratory research. Her laboratory studies communication between nerve cells in the brain and how these affect the control of movement and decision-making in medical conditions such as dystonia, TS, Parkinson’s disease, and OCD.

Tamara Hershey, Ph.D.,
Washington University
School of Medicine

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Tamara Hershey is Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine. Dr. Hershey is a neuropsychologist interested in the neural underpinnings of cognitive dysfunction in several diseases relevant to dopamine and/or development, including Tourette syndrome, Parkinson’s disease and attention deficit disorder. Using a combination of functional neuroimaging (PET and fMRI), pharmacological and cognitive techniques, Dr. Hershey is trying to differentiate the effects of these very different disease processes on dopaminergic and cognitive systems.

Joseph Garner, Ph.D.,
Stanford University

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Joseph Garner, graduated from the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom and is an Associate Professor in the Department of Comparative Medicine and Courtesy Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. His research concentrates on the relationship between abnormal repetitive behaviors in laboratory animals and similar behaviors in human neuropsychiatric disorders. He is particularly interested understanding why certain at-risk individuals develop repetitive movements, while others do not.

Denise Head, Ph.D.,
Washington University

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Dr. Head’s background is in clinical psychology with a specialty in neuropsychology. The broad focus of her research program is the exploration of the constellation of age-related brain changes and their relations with cognition. The underlying objective is to gain a greater understanding of the neural underpinnings of cognitive aging, the contributing factors and effective intervention. To accomplish these goals Dr. Head uses a variety of techniques including neuroimaging, cognitive-experimental paradigms, and self-report.

Ellen J. Hess, Ph.D.,
Emory University

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Dr. Ellen J. Hess is a Professor in the Departments of Pharmacology and Neurology at Emory University School of Medicine. She received her B.A. in Psychobiology from Wellesley College and Ph.D. in Neuroscience from University of California at San Diego with postdoctoral training at The Scripps Research Institute. Before joining the faculty at Emory University in 2008, she held academic appointments at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine. Dr. Hess’ research uses molecular genetic, pharmacological and behavioral approaches to understand the roles of the basal ganglia and cerebellum in movement disorders. Her efforts focus on the discovery and development of new treatments for movement disorders by using and creating animal models. This work forms the basis of a newly developed Antidystonia Drug Discovery Program, which now serves as a resource for preclinical antidystonia drug testing for the scientific community. In addition, she has published many scientific papers, chaired numerous scientific review panels and is invited to speak on her work throughout the world.

Jonathan W. Mink, M.D., Ph.D.,
University of Rochester Medical Center
School of Medicine & Dentistry

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Jonathan W. Mink, M.D., Ph.D. is Professor of Neurology, Neurobiology & Anatomy, Brain & Cognitive Sciences, and Pediatrics at the University of Rochester where he is also Chief of Child Neurology. Dr. Mink has an active research program that focuses on movement disorders, including Tourette Syndrome, and neurodegenerative diseases in children. Clinically, he specializes in movement disorders in children. Dr. Mink was a member of the Tourette Association Medical Advisory Board from 1999 – 2005 and has been co-chair of the Tourette Association Scientific Advisory Board since 2006.

Laurie Ozelius, Ph.D.,
Mount Sinai Medical School

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Dr. Ozelius is an Associate Professor in Genetics and Genomic Sciences and an Associate Professor in neurology at Mount Sinai Medical School. Dr. Ozelius graduated with a Ph.D. in Genetics from Harvard Medical School. Her research interests center around genetics of movement disorders, particularly hereditary dystonia and Parkinson’s disease (PD)

Rosalinda Roberts, Ph.D.,
University of Alabama at Birmingham
School of Medicine

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Dr. Rosalinda Roberts received her Ph.D. in biological sciences in the department of Anatomy and Neurobiology from the University of California, Irvine in 1986. There she studied an animal model of epilepsy using anatomical and behavioral methods. She then went to Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital to do a postdoctoral fellowship in the department of Neurology, where she studied an animal model of Huntington’s Disease. In 1990, Dr. Roberts went to the University of Maryland at Baltimore to join the Department of Psychiatry at the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center (MPRC) as an Assistant Professor. Her lifetime research focus began here as she turned her focus to the neuropathology in schizophrenia in human postmortem brain and on the effects of antipsychotic drugs in rodent models. In addition, Dr. Roberts played a major role in the management of the Maryland Brain Collection, and directed the collection for many years. During this time Dr. Roberts was the principal investigator on four NIH R01s and several foundation grants and has published over 130 manuscripts and books. In 2007 Dr. Roberts joined the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurobiology as the second holder of the Kathy Ireland Endowed Chair in Psychiatry at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL where she continues her research on ultrastructural changes in the brain in schizophrenia. She started and directs the Alabama Brain Collection and is the Tissue Coordinator for the TSA Brain Tissue Program.

Jeremiah M. Scharf, M.D., Ph.D.,
Massachusetts General Hospital

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Dr. Jeremiah Scharf is a behavioral neurologist and neuropsychiatric geneticist who works as the interface between neurology and psychiatry, employing genetics and clinical research tools to investigate the etiology and pathogenesis of Tourette Syndrome and related disorders as model neuropsychiatric illnesses. His research lab is focused on genetic and non-genetic factors that predispose individuals to TS and its common comorbidities, specifically obsessive-compulsive disorder and attentiondeficit hyperactivity disorder. Dr. Scharf is the co-chair of the Tourette Association International Consortium for Genetics Steering (Tourette AssociationICG) Committee and principal investigator of the Tourette AssociationICG multicenter U01 grant from the NINDS. Dr. Scharf is also Director of the Partners Neurology Tic Disorders Clinic at Massachusetts General Hospital, which currently sees over 75 new cases a year and provides comprehensive clinical assessments and ongoing management of TS patients referred from local, regional, national and international sources.

Laurie Ozelius, Ph.D.,
Mount Sinai Medical School

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Dr. Ozelius is an Associate Professor in Genetics and Genomic Sciences and an Associate Professor in neurology at Mount Sinai Medical School. Dr. Ozelius graduated with a Ph.D. in Genetics from Harvard Medical School. Her research interests center around genetics of movement disorders, particularly hereditary dystonia and Parkinson’s disease (PD)

David A. Peterson, Ph.D.,
University of California San Diego
and Salk Institute

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David Peterson is an Assistant Project Scientist with the Institute for Neural Computation at UCSD and the Computational Neurobiology Laboratory at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. He employs computational methods to develop better ways of objectively quantifying symptoms of movement disorders and theoretical neurobiology to develop theories for the causes of these disorders. His areas of focus include adult onset dystonia and Parkinson’s disease, with an emphasis on the role of dopamine in altered synaptic and network plasticity in the basal ganglia.